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Edtech, Ask the Experts

Raising Responsible Digital Citizens

If you’re an elementary school teacher, you instruct a class of digital natives. Digital natives were born well into the Information Age and have a strong familiarity with technology. 

 

These tiny tech enthusiasts seem to have it all figured out, leading many families and educators to believe that guidance need not extend to the cyber world. However, in more ways than adults sometimes realize, the digital world mirrors the physical world. Just as children are taught how to conduct themselves in the real world, they should be taught how to conduct themselves in cyberspace.  

 

Keyboarding Without Tears® does this in its digital citizenship unit. There are nine elements of digital citizenship according to Digital Citizenship Expert Mike Ribble. They include access, commerce, communication, literacy, etiquette, law, rights and responsibilities, health and wellness, and security.

 

Keyboarding Without Tears condenses the key elements of digital citizenship into four areas: digital information, digital consideration, digital protection and digital communication. Each lesson within the unit covers one or more of the four areas. 

 

Children are taught how to handle real-life, online situations with topics such as internet safety, digital etiquette, online navigation and other helpful information. Lessons are hands-on, interactive and carefully tailored for each grade-level. Students are encouraged to produce works of art and participate in class discussions.

 

The program is available for grades K-5 and is as easy to teach as it is to learn. Teachers are offered a large selection of resources and support including but not limited to the +Live Insights® digital dashboard for classroom management, professional development workshops, and webinars.

 

In addition to digital citizenship, students learn the features of the keyboard, proper finger placement, and how to achieve overall typing fluidity.

 

Learn more about Keyboarding Without Tears.

 

 

 

By Nikia J. - LWT Staff

Comments

By Brian M (not verified)

Well said Nikia! Even though children are very smart, we still need to take some time on a weekly basis to walk through the basics and ultimately help them make good informed decisions when they're online.

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