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Teaching Tips, Home Connection

National Book Lovers Day

August 9 is National Book Lovers Day! We’re celebrating by reading the lesser known books by some of our favorite children’s authors. While you might not find The Giving Tree or Where the Wild Things Are on this list, you’ll still find some treasures by these beloved authors. So grab a cup of tea (iced—it’s summer, after all) and gather your little learners around to celebrate all things book-related.

 

Outside Over There

By Maurice Sendak

Replete with Sendak’s signature captivatingly eerie style, Outside Over There tells the story of a brave girl who must track down her baby sister who has been stolen by goblins and return her to their mother.  

 

Would You Rather?

By John Burningham

One of the more underrecognized British children’s authors, John Birmingham, penned and illustrated Would You Rather?, which gives children the support to make important life decisions such as would you rather have supper in a castle, breakfast in a balloon, or tea on the river?

 

There’s a Nightmare in My Closet

By Mercer Mayer

While Mayer’s beloved character Little Critter is nowhere to be found in this book, it does provide children with a way to acknowledge fear of the unknown in the form of creatively imagined monsters.

 

If I Ran the Zoo

By Dr. Seuss

The Cat in the Hat is a staple for any child first learning to read, but If I Ran the Zoo is an equally essential what-if tale that finds a patron of the zoo plotting to free the animals and replace them with more exotic and Seuss-esque creatures.

 

Ellen Tebbits

By Beverly Cleary

Sometimes overshadowed by the pint-size powerhouse that is Ramona (Cleary’s most popular character), Ellen Tebbits tells the story of a friendship and a secret between Ellen and Austine as they navigate the politics of ballet class and more.

 

To build young authors in your own classroom, check out our Building Writers student workbooks for grades K–5 that provide supplemental writing practice on varied writing styles including narrative, information, and opinion writing.

 

 

By Megan ParkerMegan Parker received her Bachelor of Science degree in English from Towson University. She has a background in writing for children that includes working in the editorial department at Girls’ Life magazine, where she wrote for the print magazine and website. She has versatile experience as a writer, editor, and copywriter, and her writing has been published in magazines and newspapers. When she’s not having fun creating imaginative content at Learning Without Tears, she loves to travel the world.

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